Category: Object of the Week

Object of the Week: Violet/Ruby/Teal, Sonja …

Object of the Week: Violet/Ruby/Teal, Sonja Blomdahl, Seattle, Washington, United States, 1994. 96.4.36. 

Sonja Blomdahl has spent her career exploring color through the form of the vessel. She always works in incalmo, an Italian glassworking technique in which two or three bubbles of the same size are joined during the blowing process.

Object of the Week: Vase with Branch of Dogw…

Object of the Week: Vase with Branch of Dogwood Flowers, Émile Gallé (artist), Cristallerie d’Émile Gallé (studio), Nancy, France, about 1914. Gift of Erica Evans in memory of her mother, Lucie Loeb. 2014.3.11. 

April showers bring May flowers in the form of this vase decorated with dogwood flowers by Émile Gallé, who was born on this day in 1846.

Object of the Week: Sample of Fiberglass Str…

Object of the Week: Sample of Fiberglass Strands/Hair, Corning Glass Works, Corning, New York, United States, about 1936. Gift of Pat and Tom James. 2002.4.20. 

These brown fiberglass strands created by Corning Glass Works in the 1930s mimic the look of real human hair. Hot glass can be stretched with special machines into threads as thin (or a thousand times thinner!) than natural hair, and used for everything from optical communication fibers, to insulating homes, spacecraft and spacesuits, to the tails of birds on holiday ornaments.

Object of the Week: Shallow Bowl (Phiale), p…

Object of the Week: Shallow Bowl (Phiale), possibly Western Turkey or Rhodes, Greece, or Macedonia, about 450-330 BC. 59.1.578. 

This bowl is an early example of deliberately decolorized glass. Glassmakers discovered that adding the element antimony to glass counteracted iron impurities present in the glass recipe that make glass look greenish.

Object of the Week: Punch Bowl in “Kalana Popp…

Object of the Week: Punch Bowl in “Kalana Poppy” Pattern, C. Dorflinger & Sons, White Mills, Pennsylvania, United States, 1907-1921. 2009.4.64. 

Kalana, a combination of cutting and acid etching, was introduced by Dorflinger in 1907 to produce less expensive but still elaborate glass for the high-end market. It was made in a variety of floral patterns that were influenced by Art Nouveau, an artistic movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries that originated in France and was inspired by nature. Kalana became quite popular, but it was made for a relatively brief period; the company stopped production in 1921.

Object of the Week: Punch Bowl in “Kalana Popp…

Object of the Week: Punch Bowl in “Kalana Poppy” Pattern, C. Dorflinger & Sons, White Mills, Pennsylvania, United States, 1907-1921. 2009.4.64. 

Kalana, a combination of cutting and acid etching, was introduced by Dorflinger in 1907 to produce less expensive but still elaborate glass for the high-end market. It was made in a variety of floral patterns that were influenced by Art Nouveau, an artistic movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries that originated in France and was inspired by nature. Kalana became quite popular, but it was made for a relatively brief period; the company stopped production in 1921.

Object of the Week: Wineglass with Chinoiserie…

Object of the Week: Wineglass with Chinoiserie Scene, William Beilby and Mary Beilby (enamelers), Newcastle upon Tyne, England, about 1765. 2012.2.1. 

Happy National Siblings’ Day from The Corning Museum of Glass! The brother-and-sister glass enameling duo William and Mary Beilby used opaque white or polychrome enamel to decorate glassware with Rococo motifs, including heraldic coats of arms, flora and fauna, architectural ruins, pastoral motifs, and in this case, chinoiserie scenes. Chinoiserie refers to the 17th-and 18th-century interpretations of Oriental themes and subjects on European and American decorative arts. Chinoiserie images were easily accessible to artisans of the 18th century through published pattern books.

Object of the Week: Wineglass with Chinoiserie…

Object of the Week: Wineglass with Chinoiserie Scene, William Beilby and Mary Beilby (enamelers), Newcastle upon Tyne, England, about 1765. 2012.2.1. 

Happy National Siblings’ Day from The Corning Museum of Glass! The brother-and-sister glass enameling duo William and Mary Beilby used opaque white or polychrome enamel to decorate glassware with Rococo motifs, including heraldic coats of arms, flora and fauna, architectural ruins, pastoral motifs, and in this case, chinoiserie scenes. Chinoiserie refers to the 17th-and 18th-century interpretations of Oriental themes and subjects on European and American decorative arts. Chinoiserie images were easily accessible to artisans of the 18th century through published pattern books.

Object of the Week: California Loop Series 196…

Object of the Week: California Loop Series 1969 #29, Marvin Lipofsky (artist), University of California, Berkeley (studio), Berkeley, California, United States, 1969. 2006.4.151. 

Happy Find a Rainbow Day! There are plenty of rainbows to be found in our collection, including on this sculpture by Marvin Lipofsky. Like other studio glass pioneers of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Lipofsky uses a variety of materials in his sculpture. He coated his blown glass with a rainbow-like iridescence. He also applied Christmas tree flocking, a kind of spray-on fake snow that comes in a variety of colors.

Czech glass artist Stanislav Libensky was born…

Czech glass artist Stanislav Libensky was born on this date in 1921. Together with Jaroslava Brychtova, Libensky created large cast glass sculptures, including this one in their “Spaces” series, which explored the illusion of depth in places that didn’t exist. 

Object of the Week: Spaces I, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova, Zelezny Brod, Czechoslovakia, 1991-1992. Gift of the Ben W. Heineman Sr. Family. 2007.3.86.