Category: LE STANZE DEL VETRO

The Museum’s 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begi…

The Museum’s 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begins tomorrow. This year, Seminar focuses on cut and engraved glass. The vibrant design of this cut vase was created especially for the 1914 German Werkbund Exhibition in Cologne. Its ribbed outer walls and wavy cut decoration produce a captivating optical illusion of repeating thin vertical lines. Stay tuned on our Twitter for Seminar updates and don’t miss “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at CMoG through January 7. 

Vase, designed about 1914; manufactured about 1914–1920.  Designed by K. & K. Fachschule für Glasindustrie Haida; manufactured by Karl Meltzer & Co. Cased, mold-blown, and cut glass. H. 26.1 cm, Diam. 9.3 cm.  The Corning Museum of Glass (2017.3.55, gift of Roberta B. Elliott).

As a young architect, Josef Hoffmann was a p…

As a young architect, Josef Hoffmann was a professor at the School of Applied Arts in Vienna.  Alongside his colleagues, Hoffmann taught students how to design glass, furniture, graphics, textiles, and more. See this vase and other glass objects from the School of Applied Arts in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7! 

Vase, 1899. Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956); manufactured by E. Bakalowits & Söhne and Meyr’s Neffe. Mold-blown and iridized glass; wood. H. 46.5 cm, Diam. 17.5 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (LHG 1984-34). © MAK/ Katrin Wisskirchen.

Koloman Moser was a prolific designer in glass…

Koloman Moser was a prolific designer in glass, single-handedly producing about 400 designs from 1899 to 1903. The “Streifen und Flecken” pattern, created by Moser around 1900, was a popular motif. With its simple vertical lines punctuated by bold, playful spots, the pattern was produced in a wide variety of color combinations, shapes, and sizes. Marvel over the Vase’s bold pattern in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, now on view through January 7, 2019. 

Vase in “Streifen und Flecken” (Stripes and spots) Pattern, about 1900-1903. Designed by Koloman Moser (Austrian, 1868-1918) or School of Prof. Koloman Moser; manufactured by E. Bakalowits and Johann Lӧtz Witwe. Mold-blown, hotworked and iridized glass. H. 19.1 cm, Diam. 10.6 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (2005.3.12).

This vibrantly enameled vase was designed by t…

This vibrantly enameled vase was designed by the K. & K Fachschule für Glasindustrie Steinschönau, a technical school established in 1856.  The Steinschönau Fachschule was part of an expansive network of glass designers, technical schools, manufacturers, and retailers that made Central Europe an important and busy center for glass design, manufacture, and trade in the 20th century.  Marvel over the Vase’s intricate details in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, now on view through January 7, 2019. 

Vase, about 1915-1930. Designed by K. & K. Fachschule für Glasindustrie Steinschӧnau; possibly manufactured by Conrath & Liebsch or Friedrich Liebsch. Mold-blown, hotworked, and enameled glass. H. 16.8 cm, Diam. 24.6 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (81.3.7).

In 1897, a group of architects, artists, and d…

In 1897, a group of architects, artists, and designers broke away from Vienna’s conservative art academy to form the Vienna Secession. Their exhibition space emerged as a symbol of the new Vienna Secession style. Resting on top of the building’s heavy base is a delicate sphere of twisting gold-plated laurels. Similar elements were incorporated into objects of decorative art, like this centerpiece with twisting gold vines that supporting seven mold-blown spheres. Learn more about the Vienna Secession and this moment in design in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, now on view through January 7, 2019. 

Secession Building, Vienna, Austria, 1897–1898.  Joseph Maria Olbrich (Austrian, 1867–1908), architect.  Photo: © Foto Marburg / Art Resource, NY. Centerpiece, about 1900. Manufactured by E. Bakalowits & Sӧhne and Meyr’s Neffe. Mold-blown glass; metal. H. 10 cm, W. 26.6 cm, L. 31.8 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art (GL 3381-1-8). ©Georg Mayer. 

First displayed in the Austrian Pavilion at th…

First displayed in the Austrian Pavilion at the 1937 International Exposition of Art and Technology in Modern Life, held in Paris, this “Dressing Room for a Star” is a dazzling example of a harmoniously designed interior. The architect Josef Hoffmann designed all of the room’s components— the silvered wall panels and ceiling, mirrored floor, and furniture. Peer into this spectacular room in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO. On view through January 7, 2019. 

Reconstruction of “Dressing Room for a Star”, displayed at 1937 Paris International Exposition. Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870-1956). MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art (MAK H 3815-1, H 3815-2, 2058, H 2061; chandelier on loan from J. & L. Lobmeyr, Vienna). ©MAK/Georg Mayer. 

In their desire to bring modern design to all …

In their desire to bring modern design to all aspects of daily life, the Wiener Werkstätte established a fashion department in 1910. This handbag was designed by Maria Likarz-Strauss, a prominent Wiener Werkstätte textile and fashion designer, who also translated her spirited designs into fashion accessories. View this handbag, alongside select examples of non-glass objects, in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO. On view through January 7, 2019. 

Beaded Handbag, about 1925. Designed by Maria Likarz-Strauss (Austrian, 1893-1971); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte. Glass beads, metallic thread, cord, silk lining. H. 21.0 cm, W. 18.7 cm, Th. 1.9 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (97.3.1).

Geometric pattern emerged as a popular motif i…

Geometric pattern emerged as a popular motif in Austrian design during the early 20th century. To obtain the pattern on this Vase with Lid, a thin layer of ruby glass was applied over colorless glass—a process known as casing—before it was selectively cut away.  This traditional technique was married with modern aesthetics: specified cuts produced geometric decoration with dynamic results. See this object on view through January 7, 2019 in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO.

Vase with Lid, before 1916. Designed by Emanuel Josef Margold (Austrian, 1888-1962); manufactured by Carl Schappel. Cased, mold-blown, and cut glass. H. 22 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art (WI 1716-1,2). ©MAK/Georg Mayer.

Wiener Werkstätte co-founder Josef Hoffmann de…

Wiener Werkstätte co-founder Josef Hoffmann designed this tableware set of nine vessels.  No form in this sprawling group of nine is the same and, together, they would have produced a dynamic landscape across the table. Explore more of Hoffmann’s work in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO. On view through January 7, 2019. 

Tableware Set of Nine Blown Vessels, 1916. Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870-1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte and probably Meyr’s Neffe Glassworks. Mold blown and hotworked glass. Smallest object: H. 8.2 cm, Diam. 11.6 cm; Tallest object: H. 32.8 cm, Diam. 9.5 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (74.3.24). 

Architects and designers used design drawing…

Architects and designers used design drawings and written notes to communicate with the manufacturers and artisans responsible for executing their designs.  This design was created by the architect Josef Hoffmann and executed by the glass firm and luxury retailer J. & L. Lobmeyr.  The glasses, like many other examples on display in the exhibition, remain in production today. See other examples of design drawings and finished objects in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, now on view through January 7, 2019. 

Design Drawing for Glasses with Bronzite Decoration, 1911. Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956). Pen, color on paper.  H. 30 cm, W. 40 cm. J. & L. LOBMEYR Family Collection, Vienna. © LOBMEYR; Image courtesy of J. & L. LOBMEYR, Vienna, Austria; Liqueur Glass, “Schwarzbronzit Var. B” Series, 1911. Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte, J. & L. Lobmeyr, and Meyr’s Neffe.  Mold-blown, bronzite-coated, and etched glass. H. 7.5 cm, Diam. 3.6 cm.  MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (GL 3409). © Peter Kainz/ MAK.