Category: Glass of the Architects

Hilda Jesser, a former student of Josef Hoffma…

Hilda Jesser, a former student of Josef Hoffmann’s at the School of Applied Arts in Vienna, was an employee of the Wiener Werkstätte from 1916 to 1922. During that time, she demonstrated her versatility as an artist by creating designs for a wide variety of media, including glass, ceramics, print, embroidery, leather, metalwork, and wall paintings. Jesser enhanced the form of this vase (designed by Hoffmann) with an energetic blue and white enamel decoration that envelops the surface. See this beautiful vase on display in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, at the Museum through January 7.

Vase with Blue Flowers, about 1917. Designed and decorated by Hilda Jesser (Austrian, 1894-1985); glass form designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870-1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte and Joh. Oertel & Co. Mold-blown, hotworked, and enameled glass. H. 19.8 cm, Diam. 11.7 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (2005.3.11).

Our 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begins in j…

Our 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begins in just one month! This year’s Seminar focuses on cut and engraved glass to coincide with the opening of our newly redesigned Crystal City Gallery and our special exhibition, “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO. See the full list of speakers and register today

Plate in “Panel” Pattern, T. G. Hawkes and Company, Corning, New York, United States, 1909-1918. 2002.4.8.

Koloman Moser was a prolific designer in glass…

Koloman Moser was a prolific designer in glass, single-handedly producing about 400 designs from 1899 to 1903. The “Streifen und Flecken” pattern, created by Moser around 1900, was a popular motif. With its simple vertical lines punctuated by bold, playful spots, the pattern was produced in a wide variety of color combinations, shapes, and sizes. Marvel over the Vase’s bold pattern in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, now on view through January 7, 2019. 

Vase in “Streifen und Flecken” (Stripes and spots) Pattern, about 1900-1903. Designed by Koloman Moser (Austrian, 1868-1918) or School of Prof. Koloman Moser; manufactured by E. Bakalowits and Johann Lӧtz Witwe. Mold-blown, hotworked and iridized glass. H. 19.1 cm, Diam. 10.6 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (2005.3.12).

This vibrantly enameled vase was designed by t…

This vibrantly enameled vase was designed by the K. & K Fachschule für Glasindustrie Steinschönau, a technical school established in 1856.  The Steinschönau Fachschule was part of an expansive network of glass designers, technical schools, manufacturers, and retailers that made Central Europe an important and busy center for glass design, manufacture, and trade in the 20th century.  Marvel over the Vase’s intricate details in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, now on view through January 7, 2019. 

Vase, about 1915-1930. Designed by K. & K. Fachschule für Glasindustrie Steinschӧnau; possibly manufactured by Conrath & Liebsch or Friedrich Liebsch. Mold-blown, hotworked, and enameled glass. H. 16.8 cm, Diam. 24.6 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (81.3.7).

In 1897, a group of architects, artists, and d…

In 1897, a group of architects, artists, and designers broke away from Vienna’s conservative art academy to form the Vienna Secession. Their exhibition space emerged as a symbol of the new Vienna Secession style. Resting on top of the building’s heavy base is a delicate sphere of twisting gold-plated laurels. Similar elements were incorporated into objects of decorative art, like this centerpiece with twisting gold vines that supporting seven mold-blown spheres. Learn more about the Vienna Secession and this moment in design in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, now on view through January 7, 2019. 

Secession Building, Vienna, Austria, 1897–1898.  Joseph Maria Olbrich (Austrian, 1867–1908), architect.  Photo: © Foto Marburg / Art Resource, NY. Centerpiece, about 1900. Manufactured by E. Bakalowits & Sӧhne and Meyr’s Neffe. Mold-blown glass; metal. H. 10 cm, W. 26.6 cm, L. 31.8 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art (GL 3381-1-8). ©Georg Mayer. 

The artists, designers, and architects in our …

The artists, designers, and architects in our exhibition, “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and Le Stanze del Vetro, placed strong emphasis on handcrafted objects. Visitors often ask if it is possible for a machine to do what talented glassmakers can create by hand. Our new flameworking demo, “The Artisan’s Hand,” prepares you to explore exhibits on mechanically-produced glass in the Innovation Center and enriches this year’s “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937” exhibition. See this demo at our Flameworking Demonstration booth daily at 2:20pm.

Celebrate National Book Lovers’ Day with this …

Celebrate National Book Lovers’ Day with this ornate 25th anniversary album produced by the Wiener Werkstätte.  The album’s embossed, orange and black papier-mâché binding (designed by Vally Wieselthier and Gudrun Baudish) was so unconventional that it had to be executed, not by a bookbinder, but by a Viennese toymaker.  Images of glass objects are scattered throughout the album’s pages.  Both the book and many of the illustrated designs are on view through January 7, 2019 in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO. 

25th Anniversary Book, Die Wiener Werkstätte, 1903-1928: Modernes Kunstgewerbe und sein Weg (Modern decorative art and its path). Compiled by Mathilde Flӧgl (Austrian, 1893-1958); binding designed by Vally Wieselthier (Austrian, 1895-1945) and Gudrun Baudisch (Austrian, 1907-1982); Wiener Werkstätte (Vienna: Krystall-Verlag, 1929). Paper, papier maché binding. L. 24 cm, W. 23 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass, Rakow Research Library (169938).

First displayed in the Austrian Pavilion at th…

First displayed in the Austrian Pavilion at the 1937 International Exposition of Art and Technology in Modern Life, held in Paris, this “Dressing Room for a Star” is a dazzling example of a harmoniously designed interior. The architect Josef Hoffmann designed all of the room’s components— the silvered wall panels and ceiling, mirrored floor, and furniture. Peer into this spectacular room in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO. On view through January 7, 2019. 

Reconstruction of “Dressing Room for a Star”, displayed at 1937 Paris International Exposition. Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870-1956). MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art (MAK H 3815-1, H 3815-2, 2058, H 2061; chandelier on loan from J. & L. Lobmeyr, Vienna). ©MAK/Georg Mayer. 

In their desire to bring modern design to all …

In their desire to bring modern design to all aspects of daily life, the Wiener Werkstätte established a fashion department in 1910. This handbag was designed by Maria Likarz-Strauss, a prominent Wiener Werkstätte textile and fashion designer, who also translated her spirited designs into fashion accessories. View this handbag, alongside select examples of non-glass objects, in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO. On view through January 7, 2019. 

Beaded Handbag, about 1925. Designed by Maria Likarz-Strauss (Austrian, 1893-1971); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte. Glass beads, metallic thread, cord, silk lining. H. 21.0 cm, W. 18.7 cm, Th. 1.9 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (97.3.1).

Geometric pattern emerged as a popular motif i…

Geometric pattern emerged as a popular motif in Austrian design during the early 20th century. To obtain the pattern on this Vase with Lid, a thin layer of ruby glass was applied over colorless glass—a process known as casing—before it was selectively cut away.  This traditional technique was married with modern aesthetics: specified cuts produced geometric decoration with dynamic results. See this object on view through January 7, 2019 in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO.

Vase with Lid, before 1916. Designed by Emanuel Josef Margold (Austrian, 1888-1962); manufactured by Carl Schappel. Cased, mold-blown, and cut glass. H. 22 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art (WI 1716-1,2). ©MAK/Georg Mayer.