Category: Glass of the Architects

The artist Vally Wieselthier worked as a desig…

The artist Vally Wieselthier worked as a designer for the Wiener Werkstätte from 1917 to 1922 when she then left to begin her own studio. Wieselthier is perhaps best-known today as a ceramicist, but during her time at the Wiener Werkstätte, she designed for ceramics, glass, textiles and more.  On this vase, Wieselthier framed two reclining nudes with energetic red stripes and vibrant blue and white floral decoration. See more glass from the Wiener Werkstätte in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, only on view at CMoG through January 6! 

Vase with Reclining Female Figures, 1917–1920. Designed by Vally (Valerie) Wieselthier (Austrian, 1895–1945); glass form designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte and Joh. Oertel & Co. Blown, hotworked, and enameled glass. H. 14.4 cm, Diam. 15.8 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (87.3.3).

Members of the Wiener Werkstätte often collabo…

Members of the Wiener Werkstätte often collaborated on products and architectural projects. Werkstätte designers and artisans, for example, frequently applied decorative surface treatments to iconic glass forms designed by the workshop. This vase is an example of such collaboration: Josef Hoffmann designed the vase’s form, and Hilda Jesser designed the decoration. Explore more glass from the Wiener Werkstätte in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at CMoG only through January 6! 

Footed Bowl, about 1920.  Designed by Hilda Jesser (Austrian, 1894–1985); glass form designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte. Mold-blown, etched, cut, and iridized glass. H. 13.1 cm, Diam. 12.6 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (GL 3303). © Kristina Satori/ MAK.

A new technique called Bronzite decoration w…

A new technique called Bronzite decoration was developed shortly before 1910. It involved coating the entire surface of a glass with a black or brown metallic paste and re-firing the vessel. Then, the desired ornament was covered with an asphalt lacquer and the uncovered areas were etched away with acid. The acid etching removed the unwanted coating, created a matte surface, and left behind the desired design. See this champagne cup and other Bronzite decorated glass, in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, only on view at CMoG through January 7! 

Champagne Cup, “Schwarzbronzit Var. C” Series, designed 1911, manufactured after 1912. Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte, J. & L. Lobmeyr, and Meyr’s Neffe. Mold-blown, bronzite-coated, and etched glass. H. 11.8 cm, Diam. 10.3 cm. MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (WI 1675). © Nathan Murrell.  

Imagine eating your Thanksgiving dinner with s…

Imagine eating your Thanksgiving dinner with silverware stored in its own silk-covered presentation box! A group of architects and designers in early 20th century Austria believed in creating complete, modern interiors. They designed everything from buildings to the items inside, including glass and silverware. Explore more of this moment in design in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7! 

Five-Piece Silverware Set in Presentation Box, 1912. Designed by Carl Otto Czeschka (Austrian, 1878–1960); “Blumenwiese” silk pattern designed by Arthur Scharrisch (Austrian, 1888– unknown date). Manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte. Handmade and repoussé silver; malachite; silk-covered presentation box. On loan from Richard Grubman.

The detailed design on this lidded box was exe…

The detailed design on this lidded box was executed with a traditional glass decorating technique of Schwartzlot (painting with black enamel on glass). Developed in the seventeenth century, Schwartzlot was often used for finely detailed imagery. The decorative technique experienced a revival in the early twentieth century as designers successfully adapted Schwartzlot for innovative styles and patterning. Take time to investigate this and other Schwartzlot objects in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7. 

Box with Lid, 1913. Designed and manufactured by Karl Massnetz (Austrian, 1890-1918). Mold-blown, hot-worked, enameled, and gilded glass. H. 12.3 cm; Diam. 11.1 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (WI 1269-1, -2). © Kristina Satori/ MAK.

This mold-blown, fluted vase was designed by J…

This mold-blown, fluted vase was designed by Josef Hoffmann for the Wiener Werkstätte. When promoting and selling their designs, the Wiener Werkstätte would display a variety of objects together to produce dynamic compositions. In one contemporary illustration, a blue example of this vase was displayed with a silk textile and a hand-embossed silver tea and coffee service. Collectively, they demonstrate that the workshop produced objects meant to be purchased, displayed, and used in concert with one another. Explore more glassware from the Wiener Werkstätte in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7. 

Fluted Vase, about 1922.  Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte and Meyr’s Neffe.  Mold-blown and hot-worked glass. H. 23 cm, Diam. 14.5 cm.  The Corning Museum of Glass (97.3.9). Illustration from Die Wiener Werkstätte, 1903–1928: Modernes Kunstgewerbe und sein Weg, (Modern decorative art and its path), featuring the silk Crêpe de Chine in the “Anemone” pattern by Felice Ueno Rix (Austrian, 1893–1967) and a silver tea and coffee service and glass vase by Josef Hoffmann, Compiled by Mathilde Flӧgl (Austrian, 1893–1958); binding designed by Vally Wieselthier (Austrian, 1895–1945) and Gudrun Baudisch (Austrian, 1907–1982); Wiener Werkstätte (Vienna: Krystall-Verlag, 1929). Paper, papier maché binding. L. 24 cm, W. 23 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass, Rakow Research Library (169938).

This ewer and tumbler were designed by student…

This ewer and tumbler were designed by students at the School of Applied Arts in Vienna.  The bright yellow polka dots and applied yellow handle on the ewer lend vibrancy and cheer to these functional objects. Explore other examples of brightly colored and brilliantly executed early 20th-century glass in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7. 

Ewer and Tumbler, before 1905.  Designed by K. & K. Wiener Kunstgewerbeschule.  Blown, hot-worked, etched, and cut glass.  H. 17.2 cm, Diam. 8.2 cm.; H. 14.3 cm, Diam. 7.2 cm.  MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (WI 529; WI 575). © MAK/ Kristina Wissik.

This vase depicts the romance of Ariadne and…

This vase depicts the romance of Ariadne and Bacchus. In Classical mythology, Bacchus falls in love with Ariadne after he and his reveling followers encounter her on the shores of the Island of Naxos.  Broken-hearted and deserted by her former lover, Ariadne accepts Bacchus’ offer of marriage. The “Ariadne” vase was designed by Lotte Fink, engraved August Bischof Jr., and manufactured by the firm J. & L. Lobmeyr.  Swipe through to see Bischof’s mark and the engraved date. Explore outstanding examples of Austrian glass in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, only on view at CMoG through January 7!

“Ariadne” Vase, designed 1923; manufactured 1925. Designed by Lotte Fink (Austrian, 1898–1984); manufactured by J. & L. Lobmeyr, probably engraved by August Bischof Jr. (Austrian, 1889–1977). Blown and engraved glass. H. 17.6 cm, Diam. 14.8 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (72.3.10).

The Museum’s 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begi…

The Museum’s 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begins tomorrow. This year, Seminar focuses on cut and engraved glass. The vibrant design of this cut vase was created especially for the 1914 German Werkbund Exhibition in Cologne. Its ribbed outer walls and wavy cut decoration produce a captivating optical illusion of repeating thin vertical lines. Stay tuned on our Twitter for Seminar updates and don’t miss “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at CMoG through January 7. 

Vase, designed about 1914; manufactured about 1914–1920.  Designed by K. & K. Fachschule für Glasindustrie Haida; manufactured by Karl Meltzer & Co. Cased, mold-blown, and cut glass. H. 26.1 cm, Diam. 9.3 cm.  The Corning Museum of Glass (2017.3.55, gift of Roberta B. Elliott).

Often, comparing design drawings to the finish…

Often, comparing design drawings to the finished products reveal that designs can change during the manufacturing process. This design drawing and vase are by Dagobert Peche. The drawing does not include the stars that adorn the final vase. In fact, Peche wrote the following note, in German, “I would be happy if the glass otherwise remains entirely white.” But, off to the right, someone else wrote the note: “Received little stars.” See both the design drawing and vase in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7. 

Design Drawing for Vase, Model Nr. A I 787-143, about 1919. Dagobert Peche (Austrian, 1887–1923). Graphite pencil and gouache on paper. H. 26 cm, W. 21.2 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art (KI 12782-21). ©MAK; Pokal with Cut Stars, about 1919-1920. Designed by Dagobert Peche (Austrian, 1887–1923); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte and Joh. Oertel & Co. Cased, mold-blown, and cut glass. H. 22.7 cm, Diam. 17.1 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (2010.3.134).