Category: flameworking

Guest artist John Zinner created a pair of d…

Guest artist John Zinner created a pair of dancing devils on the torch today in the Amphitheater Hot Shop!

See guest artist John Zinner during a live, …

See guest artist John Zinner during a live, narrated demonstration in the Amphitheater Hot Shop on April 30 from 2 to 4 pm. Zinner, a flameworker from Lauscha, Germany, will create a new figurative sculpture inspired by mythical creatures and nature.

This past weekend at The Studio, Jim Byrnes …

This past weekend at The Studio, Jim Byrnes taught an introduction to scientific flameworking using borosilicate glass.

Artist-in-residence Shinobu Kurosawa has been …

Artist-in-residence Shinobu Kurosawa has been inspired by landmarks in Corning during her time at The Studio. Over the course of three days, she created this tonbodama necklace with Corning-inspired murrine patterns.

After creating a round bead with white glass, …

After creating a round bead with white glass, artist-in-residence Shinobu Kurosawa carefully applies green murrine that look like leaves to the bead. Once those murrine were melted into the bead and the shape marvered, Shinobu then applied light pink murrine and a layer of colorless glass to complete a simple “tonbodama” bead. Stay tuned for more updates from Shinobu’s residency!

Artist-in-residence Shinobu Kurosawa creates h…

Artist-in-residence Shinobu Kurosawa creates her beautiful landscape beads with a set-up that may be unfamiliar to American flameworkers. She uses a soft glass with a coefficient of expansion of 126, meaning that the glass shrinks a lot as it gets colder. This glass is worked over a forced-air torch that runs at about 1832 degrees Fahrenheit (1000 degrees Celsius). Shinobu pre-heats the murrine she incorporates into these beads in a tray next to the flame. Stay tuned for more updates from Shinobu’s residency at The Studio!

We’re commemorating Women’s Hist…

We’re commemorating Women’s History Month with a look at five women working in glass today. 

For Susan Plum, glass is a metaphor for light and a way to make visible what is invisible. Made using borosilicate glass, Woven Heaven, Tangled Earth was inspired by her research into ancient Mesoamerican cosmological systems. 

Plum says: “The woven work in glass that I have done over the last several years was originally inspired by the Mayan goddess Ixchel, the first weaver of the Americas. I later discovered that Mayan and other Mesoamerican traditions use the weaver’s loom as a metaphor for the universe. The loom of the universe is believed to be constructed of filaments of light from which the Heavens and Earth are said to be woven. These woven strands of light can become entangled around the Earth, and it is the job of Mayan shamans to untangle this ‘discord.’ Thus, the act of weaving, for the Maya, symbolically rebuilds and re-energizes the world.” 

Woven Heaven, Tangled Earth, Susan Plum (artist), UrbanGlass (studio), Brooklyn, New York, United States, 1999. 2001.4.70.

Marble-maker and flameworker Miles Parker is t…

Marble-maker and flameworker Miles Parker is teaching students in his class how to create whole worlds in tiny glass spheres using a variety of techniques. Get an insider’s view during this live stream from his class “Borosilicate Marbles” on February 13 at 11 am Eastern.

See guest artist David Sandidge in the Amphi…

See guest artist David Sandidge in the Amphitheater Hot Shop January 11 and 12 from 10 am to 12 pm and 1 to 3 pm. Sandidge will be bringing his fanciful glass figures to life with the help of the Museum’s Hot Glass Team. Can’t make it to the Museum? We’ll be live-streaming one of Sandidge’s demonstrations Friday, January 11 2 to 4 pm.

Do you want to learn something new in the ne…

Do you want to learn something new in the new year? Sign up for one of our week-long intensive glassmaking classes at The Studio! We still have spaces available in Margaret Neher’s “Elements of Flower Construction,” happening January 28-February 2. Using borosilicate glass, students will explore flower structure, use of reference materials, special forming and texturing tools, and attention to realism using layering, shade mixing, and frits and powders. Students will also look at ways of adapting glass flowers to various applications from jewelry to freestanding sculptures.