Category: Corning Museum of Glass

Parked at The Corning Museum of Glass, this …

Parked at The Corning Museum of Glass, this concept car shows how glass can shape the design and function of automobiles, inside and out. The car, made by Corning Incorporated, includes Gorilla® Glass, the company’s chemically tempered glass used in many smartphones. See this car on display on the Museum’s West Bridge now through December 8, 2019!

This fall at The Studio, we’ve hosted st…

This fall at The Studio, we’ve hosted students of all experience levels for one-day, weekend, and ten-week classes exploring glassmaking techniques. Want to learn how to make glass or learn a new technique? Check out our offerings for classes at The Studio this winter.

Guest artist Sigga Heimis’ larger-than…

Guest artist Sigga Heimis’ larger-than-life glass organs are out of the annealer! Sigga will be using these organs in an upcoming installation with light and sound effects to bring these organs to life.

Sigga Heimis and the Hot Glass Team put their …

Sigga Heimis and the Hot Glass Team put their heads together today to create a large brain out of glass in the Amphitheater Hot Shop. Don’t miss guest artist Sigga Heimis at the Museum tomorrow 10 am to 12 pm and 1 to 4 pm!

Object of the Week: Boxed Set of Christmas Orn…

Object of the Week: Boxed Set of Christmas Ornaments, Corning Glass Works, Corning, New York, United States, 1950-1959. Gift of Jane E. Preston. 2009.4.79. 

Corning, New York is famous for glass innovation at the intersection of art, science, and industry. The same ribbon machine Corning Glass Works invented to create hundreds of light bulbs a minute was fitted with different molds used to make lustrous Christmas ornaments. Will you be using any Corning Glass Works ornaments in your decorations this season?

Designer Sigga Heimis will be demonstrating in…

Designer Sigga Heimis will be demonstrating in the Amphitheater Hot Shop December 5 and December 6 10 am to 12 pm and 1 to 4 pm. She’ll be creating large-scale human organs, a series she began working on with our Hot Glass Team as part of our GlassLab program.

Illustrations from manufacturing books like Ge…

Illustrations from manufacturing books like Georg Agricola’s 1556 “De re metallica” serve as important evidence of what glass furnaces looked like in a time before photography. Do you see similarities between this glasshouse and glass studios today? Explore more historical images of glassmakers in “Curious and Curiouser: Surprising Finds from the Rakow Library,” on view through February 17.

Georgii Agricolae De re metallica (Georgius Agricola’s On the nature of metals), Georg Agricola (pseudonym for Georg Bauer, German, 1494–1555), Basel, Switzerland: probably Apvd Hieron Frobenivm et Nicolavm Episcopivm, 1556. CMGL 93693.

Today, The Corning Museum of Glass (CMoG) anno…

Today, The Corning Museum of Glass (CMoG) announced that 100 artists—representing 32 nationalities and working in 25 countries—have been selected to exhibit in New Glass Now, a global survey of contemporary glass and the first exhibition of its kind organized by the Museum in 40 years. The show, which will be on view from May 12, 2019, through January 5, 2020, will include works ranging from large-scale installations and delicate miniatures to video and experiments in glass chemistry, all of which demonstrate the vitality and versatility of this dynamic material. 

Problematica (Foam Rock), Sarah Briland (United States, b. 1980), Richmond, Virginia, United States, 2016. Foam, Aqua Resin, glass microspheres, steel, concrete stand. With stand: 96.5 x 52 x 45.7 cm. Photo: Terry Brown.

Next Tuesday, December 4 at 12 pm Eastern, j…

Next Tuesday, December 4 at 12 pm Eastern, join us for a live stream from the Conservation Lab, watch as Steve Koob, chief conservator, Astrid van Giffen, associate conservator, and Lianne Uesato, assistant conservator share the issues and concerns that conservators keep an eye out for when managing a collection of glass objects that spans from ancient to contemporary. The conservators will show detailed examples of the condition issues of archaeological objects, how they handle glass with sensitive surfaces, the challenges of glass with previous repairs, and the potential difficulties of caring for contemporary glass. Tune in live at www.cmog.org/live.

A new technique called Bronzite decoration w…

A new technique called Bronzite decoration was developed shortly before 1910. It involved coating the entire surface of a glass with a black or brown metallic paste and re-firing the vessel. Then, the desired ornament was covered with an asphalt lacquer and the uncovered areas were etched away with acid. The acid etching removed the unwanted coating, created a matte surface, and left behind the desired design. See this champagne cup and other Bronzite decorated glass, in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, only on view at CMoG through January 7! 

Champagne Cup, “Schwarzbronzit Var. C” Series, designed 1911, manufactured after 1912. Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte, J. & L. Lobmeyr, and Meyr’s Neffe. Mold-blown, bronzite-coated, and etched glass. H. 11.8 cm, Diam. 10.3 cm. MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (WI 1675). © Nathan Murrell.