Category: CMoG

The Museum’s 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begi…

The Museum’s 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begins tomorrow. This year, Seminar focuses on cut and engraved glass. The vibrant design of this cut vase was created especially for the 1914 German Werkbund Exhibition in Cologne. Its ribbed outer walls and wavy cut decoration produce a captivating optical illusion of repeating thin vertical lines. Stay tuned on our Twitter for Seminar updates and don’t miss “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at CMoG through January 7. 

Vase, designed about 1914; manufactured about 1914–1920.  Designed by K. & K. Fachschule für Glasindustrie Haida; manufactured by Karl Meltzer & Co. Cased, mold-blown, and cut glass. H. 26.1 cm, Diam. 9.3 cm.  The Corning Museum of Glass (2017.3.55, gift of Roberta B. Elliott).

Object of the Week: Set (Garniture) of Five Va…

Object of the Week: Set (Garniture) of Five Vases, La Manufacture de Cristaux du Creusot, probably Burgundy, France, 1786–1794. 2017.3.8 A-E. 

Displaying a vase on a mantelpiece or table is so commonplace today that it seems like an obvious household decoration. The ornamental vase only began to make an appearance in European domestic interiors only in the early 17th century, and it was primarily associated with the display of porcelain imported from China. Complete garnitures of glass from the period are extremely rare.

The workmen who created the 200-inch disk fo…

The workmen who created the 200-inch disk for Corning Glass Works certainly help give the viewer an idea of exactly how large this disk is. The Rakow Library’s holdings relating to the 200-inch disk serve as an inspiration to those who wish to explore the limits of their glassmaking abilities. How does the Rakow Library inspire you? Share your inspirations with using #RakowInspired and learn more about the 200-inch disk in “Curious and Curiouser: Surprising Finds from the Rakow Library.” 

[Slide of workmen standing in front of 200" disk with one man inside center of disk], 1935. George V. McCauley papers. CMGL 116539.

“You’ll never serve an underdone…

“You’ll never serve an underdone cake, or a soggy pie—if you bake them in Pyrex!,” proclaims this ad in the February 1926 issue of Ladies’ Home Journal. On this National Dessert Day, we’re looking at the dish America has been using to bake cakes and pies since 1915. Searching for a cake pan that could evenly distribute heat, Bessie Littleton asked her husband, Corning Glass Works scientist Jesse T. Littleton, to bring home samples of Corning’s new non-expansion glass so she could try baking with it. The rest is history. At the time this ad ran in 1926, over 25,000,000 pieces of Pyrex had been sold. Will you be baking a sweet treat in Pyrex today to celebrate? 

“For perfect baking, always use Pyrex!” Corning Glass Works.   Ladies’ Home Journal  February 1926, pp. [141] CMGL 140436.

Object of the Week: Optical Model of the Eye, …

Object of the Week: Optical Model of the Eye, probably France, 1800-1899. 2004.3.40. 

The French philosopher René Descartes suggested in 1637 that in order to understand the optical properties of the eye, one should study the eyeball of a recently deceased man or that of a freshly killed large animal. Beginning in the late 17th century, optical models provided a more convenient alternative. The lens of the model projects an inverted and reversed image onto a matted screen on the back. Two lenses can be placed in front of the eye to demonstrate the corrective lenses for near- and farsightedness.

Often, comparing design drawings to the finish…

Often, comparing design drawings to the finished products reveal that designs can change during the manufacturing process. This design drawing and vase are by Dagobert Peche. The drawing does not include the stars that adorn the final vase. In fact, Peche wrote the following note, in German, “I would be happy if the glass otherwise remains entirely white.” But, off to the right, someone else wrote the note: “Received little stars.” See both the design drawing and vase in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7. 

Design Drawing for Vase, Model Nr. A I 787-143, about 1919. Dagobert Peche (Austrian, 1887–1923). Graphite pencil and gouache on paper. H. 26 cm, W. 21.2 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art (KI 12782-21). ©MAK; Pokal with Cut Stars, about 1919-1920. Designed by Dagobert Peche (Austrian, 1887–1923); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte and Joh. Oertel & Co. Cased, mold-blown, and cut glass. H. 22.7 cm, Diam. 17.1 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass (2010.3.134).

For 19th-century New Yorkers, what could be …

For 19th-century New Yorkers, what could be more entertaining than watching Mr. Finn make glass on Broadway? Luckily for them, this handbill announced that Mr. Finn’s stay on Broadway had been extended due to demand. See more of the Rakow Library’s holdings related to itinerant glassworkers in “Curious and Curiouser: Surprising Finds from the Rakow Library.” 

Exhibition of Fancy Glass Working No. 202, Broadway: Mr. Finn, New York: J. Booth & Sons, probably 1828. CMGL 163865.

Celebrate World Octopus Day with this fanciful…

Celebrate World Octopus Day with this fanciful chandelier by Maria Grazia Rosin and acclaimed glass sculptor Pino Signoretto! With its waving arms, murky colors, and staring eyes, the octopus evokes the mysterious depths of the ocean. This subject is perfect for Venice, a city long associated with both glass and the sea. 

Folpo Nero” (Black octopus), Maria Grazia Rosin (artist), Pino Signoretto (assistant), Vetreria Pino Signoretto (studio), Murano, Venice, Italy, 2003. 2003.3.45.

After carefully crafting molds out of sand wit…

After carefully crafting molds out of sand with plaster forms, artist-in-residence Aaron Pexa ladled molten glass over aluminum foil to create pieces for his stop-motion animation video. Stay tuned for more updates from Aaron’s residency at The Studio!

Our 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begins in jus…

Our 57th Annual Seminar on Glass begins in just two weeks! This year, we’re taking a look at cut and engraved glass. Seminar speakers will explore international influences on this art form from 1825–1945. Register for Seminar today.

2 Decanters with Stoppers, Augustus W. Haselbauer (engraver), Hoare & Dailey (manufacturer), probably Corning, New York, United States, about 1877. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. George M. Wyckoff, Jr. 83.4.161.