Author: CORNING MUSEUM OF GLASS

The detailed design on this lidded box was exe…

The detailed design on this lidded box was executed with a traditional glass decorating technique of Schwartzlot (painting with black enamel on glass). Developed in the seventeenth century, Schwartzlot was often used for finely detailed imagery. The decorative technique experienced a revival in the early twentieth century as designers successfully adapted Schwartzlot for innovative styles and patterning. Take time to investigate this and other Schwartzlot objects in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7. 

Box with Lid, 1913. Designed and manufactured by Karl Massnetz (Austrian, 1890-1918). Mold-blown, hot-worked, enameled, and gilded glass. H. 12.3 cm; Diam. 11.1 cm. MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (WI 1269-1, -2). © Kristina Satori/ MAK.

Object of the Week: Fruit Basket, Boston &…

Object of the Week: Fruit Basket, Boston & Sandwich Glass Company, Sandwich, Massachusetts, United States, 1845–1860. 2004.4.36. 

Openwork sides are rare in pressed glass since the form is difficult to press and then remove from the mold without damage. The form’s open sides enhance its function as a fruit basket—allowing air to circulate around the fruit, keeping it fresh.

The New York firm of Buchholz and Zelt sent de…

The New York firm of Buchholz and Zelt sent design drawings embellished with glass jewels to their producers in Bohemia. These jewels served as inspiration and a guide to workers as they created the glass designs. See other design drawings decorated with glass in “Curious and Curiouser: Surprising Finds from the Rakow Library,” on view through February 17. 

Design drawing for decanter and cosmetic jar with jeweled embellishments, Buchholz and Zelt, New York, New York, United States, about 1900-1930. CMGL 134170.

Today, artist-in-residence Penelope Rakov we…

Today, artist-in-residence Penelope Rakov welcomed students from Salem Community College’s glassmaking programs at The Studio as she demonstrated her murrine-making process. Stay tuned for more updates from Penelope’s residency!

This mold-blown, fluted vase was designed by J…

This mold-blown, fluted vase was designed by Josef Hoffmann for the Wiener Werkstätte. When promoting and selling their designs, the Wiener Werkstätte would display a variety of objects together to produce dynamic compositions. In one contemporary illustration, a blue example of this vase was displayed with a silk textile and a hand-embossed silver tea and coffee service. Collectively, they demonstrate that the workshop produced objects meant to be purchased, displayed, and used in concert with one another. Explore more glassware from the Wiener Werkstätte in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7. 

Fluted Vase, about 1922.  Designed by Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956); manufactured by Wiener Werkstätte and Meyr’s Neffe.  Mold-blown and hot-worked glass. H. 23 cm, Diam. 14.5 cm.  The Corning Museum of Glass (97.3.9). Illustration from Die Wiener Werkstätte, 1903–1928: Modernes Kunstgewerbe und sein Weg, (Modern decorative art and its path), featuring the silk Crêpe de Chine in the “Anemone” pattern by Felice Ueno Rix (Austrian, 1893–1967) and a silver tea and coffee service and glass vase by Josef Hoffmann, Compiled by Mathilde Flӧgl (Austrian, 1893–1958); binding designed by Vally Wieselthier (Austrian, 1895–1945) and Gudrun Baudisch (Austrian, 1907–1982); Wiener Werkstätte (Vienna: Krystall-Verlag, 1929). Paper, papier maché binding. L. 24 cm, W. 23 cm. The Corning Museum of Glass, Rakow Research Library (169938).

Object of the Week: Black Water Spirit, Presto…

Object of the Week: Black Water Spirit, Preston Singletary, Seattle, Washington, United States, 2006. 2010.4.56. 

Descended from a Tlingit clan of Southeastern Alaska, Preston Singletary studies ancient designs made in traditional materials, such as cedar, shell, and bone, and he recreates them in a modern, nontraditional medium: glass.

Flameworker Bandhu Dunham was inspired to cr…

Flameworker Bandhu Dunham was inspired to create this kinetic sculpture after researching itinerant glassworkers and their working glass steam engines at the Rakow Library. His engine “The Crystal Gem,” is named after an engine built by itinerant glassworker George Woodroffe 1876. See Dunham’s “The Crystal Gem” in action at “Curious and Curiouser: Surprising Finds from the Rakow Library.” 

The Crystal Gem, Bandhu Scott Dunham, Prescott, Arizona and Corning, New York, United States, 2006. Lent by The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass. RR26605.1. 

It’s time to set the clocks back an hour and p…

It’s time to set the clocks back an hour and prepare for longer nights with the end of Daylight Savings Time. Bring a little extra light into your home with these cut glass lighting devices. Each of these three lighting devices uses a different source of illumination: candles, kerosene, or electricity. All of them were made around 1900, when a major shift in lighting technology occurred with the introduction of electric light in homes across America. They would have been among the most expensive styles of lighting devices you could purchase for your home. Learn more about cut glass in our Crystal City Gallery. 

Candelabrum in “Brazilian” Pattern, T. G. Hawkes & Company, Corning, New York, 1889-1900. Gift in memory of Dr. Norman L. Corah from family and friends. 2001.4.132; Kerosene Banquet Lamp in “Victoria” Pattern, J. Hoare & Company (cutting), Dorflinger Glass Works (blank), Plume & Atwood Manufacturing Company (metal), Corning, New York, White Mills, Pennsylvania, Waterbury, Connecticut, United States, about 1895-1905. Purchased with funds from the Martha J. Herpst Estate. 2012.4.120; Electric Lamp, probably J. Hoare & Company, Corning, New York, United States, about 1900-1910. Gift of Anne G. Falls in memory of Dr. Charles and Mary Annabel and their son, Edward. 2000.4.15.

Our November artist-in-residence Penelope Ra…

Our November artist-in-residence Penelope Rakov is already preparing murrine in the hot shop with assistant Cat Burns! During her month-long residency, Penelope is focusing her attention on the process of constructing murrine, and hopes to “reconsider what it means to bring an object to completion.“ She’ll be spending lots of time in the cold shop bringing the patterns of her murrine to life. Stay tuned this month for more updates from Penelope’s residency!

This ewer and tumbler were designed by student…

This ewer and tumbler were designed by students at the School of Applied Arts in Vienna.  The bright yellow polka dots and applied yellow handle on the ewer lend vibrancy and cheer to these functional objects. Explore other examples of brightly colored and brilliantly executed early 20th-century glass in “Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900–1937,” a cooperation of the MAK and LE STANZE DEL VETRO, on view at the Museum through January 7. 

Ewer and Tumbler, before 1905.  Designed by K. & K. Wiener Kunstgewerbeschule.  Blown, hot-worked, etched, and cut glass.  H. 17.2 cm, Diam. 8.2 cm.; H. 14.3 cm, Diam. 7.2 cm.  MAK, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art (WI 529; WI 575). © MAK/ Kristina Wissik.