It’s time to set the clocks back an hour and p…

It’s time to set the clocks back an hour and prepare for longer nights with the end of Daylight Savings Time. Bring a little extra light into your home with these cut glass lighting devices. Each of these three lighting devices uses a different source of illumination: candles, kerosene, or electricity. All of them were made around 1900, when a major shift in lighting technology occurred with the introduction of electric light in homes across America. They would have been among the most expensive styles of lighting devices you could purchase for your home. Learn more about cut glass in our Crystal City Gallery. 

Candelabrum in “Brazilian” Pattern, T. G. Hawkes & Company, Corning, New York, 1889-1900. Gift in memory of Dr. Norman L. Corah from family and friends. 2001.4.132; Kerosene Banquet Lamp in “Victoria” Pattern, J. Hoare & Company (cutting), Dorflinger Glass Works (blank), Plume & Atwood Manufacturing Company (metal), Corning, New York, White Mills, Pennsylvania, Waterbury, Connecticut, United States, about 1895-1905. Purchased with funds from the Martha J. Herpst Estate. 2012.4.120; Electric Lamp, probably J. Hoare & Company, Corning, New York, United States, about 1900-1910. Gift of Anne G. Falls in memory of Dr. Charles and Mary Annabel and their son, Edward. 2000.4.15.